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Entrance fee and Permit in Nepal

We have created this page to help you, our customer to understand Entrance Fees and Permit system in Nepal.
It is all really very simple. Government of Nepal and all its cultural and religious institutions, not different to any other countries, are obligated to preserve and maintain their endowment on behalf the community, city, country or the world (UNESCO world heritage). Whether museums, tourist attractions, national treasures in the world you visit be it Vatican museum, Tower of London, Churches of Jerusalem, Sydney Opera House, Skyscrapers in New York or Egyptian Pyramids there is an entrance fee applied as a contribution to the maintenance and upkeep of the monument to preserve it for future generations.

There is a balance to be struck between national, religious, cultural and economical factors. People have used certain monuments for religious ceremonies for over hundreds or thousands of years and value the monument as religious place of warship and often don’t perceive its world heritage value. Tourists on the other hand see it purely as a monument to be visited and preserved. The institutions presiding over the benefit of the monument face an unenvious task of balancing the interests of both camps. The money, which we visitors pay to see these treasures, contributes in part to the preservation for future generations, who have the right to experience the world as we do.
Mountains are part of natural resource and most countries, even those wealthy with mineral resources derive fees and income from permits to climb special mountains like Denali in the USA or Aconcagua in Argentina. For Nepalese government fees are an important part of export income.

Climbing Permits:

Nepal government has designated many peaks as open [peaks_opened_for_mountaineering.php] for climbing and is in a unique position of having many peaks not being climbed yet. The government has developed a Climbing Permit policy ensuring fair access to Nepalese climbers [climbing_permit.php] to first climb unclimbed peaks, who by far would not be able to match funds of foreign people in the race for climbing permits. The fees contribute to national system of rangers protecting and maintaining significant climbing areas from abuse, vandalism and undue overuse.

National Park and TIMS Fees:

National Parks in Nepal are also subject to fees, which help in protection of parks, maintenance of trails and contribute to the national system of park rangers. In order to visit any park in Nepal there is applicable NTNC[trekking_permit.php] (National trust for Nature Conservation) Entry Permit. All trekkers, climbers and mountaineers are required also to obtain TIMS [tims_information.php] card (Trekkers Information Management System). TIMS system is run by the government of Nepal as a conservation planning management tool.

Entrance Fees:

Most of museums and cultural and religious monuments charge a small fee to national and foreign tourists. For obvious economical and social reasons the fee for national tourists is lower or it doesn’t apply. Some fees to significant tourist attractions are listed below:

 

Visiting Place SARRC Other Foreign Visitors
Kathmandu Durbar Square: RS 200 RS 750
Bhaktapur Durbar Square: RS 200 RS1100
Patan Durbar Square: RS 100 RS 500
Swayambhunath: RS 50 RS 200
Pashupatinath: RS 50 RS 500
Buddhanath: RS 50 RS 200
Lumbini: RS 50 RS 200
Chitwan National Park: U$10 U$10
Bardia National Park: U$10 U$10